IELTS| Verbs: Learn verbs because you want to pass English exams, How you can Identify a Verb,Types of Verbs and Examples

IELTS| Verbs: How you can improve your vocabulary with the use of Verbs, Types of Verbs and Examples
IELTS| Verbs: How you can improve your vocabulary with the use of Verbs, Types of Verbs and Examples

 

 

What is a Verb?

Types of Verbs

Hello there! I’ve come again today with yet another exciting and promising article for your reading pleasure. Our topic today is on “verb”.

The international English Language system cannot do without verb. It is a must for all who desire to learn or study English. It’s very essential for our everyday use of English; in our speaking, writing or listening.

So without much further ado… let’s get started!

WHAT IS A VERB?

A verb is a word that expresses an action or occurrence. It forms the main part of a sentence and tells/expresses the subject in two ways

  • Action of the subject
  • State of being of the subject

Action verb shows the action that the subject of a sentence does, did in the past, or will do in the future. The state of being of the subject expresses the mood of the subject.

Example of an action verb performed by the subject

  1. John kicked the football
  2. She ate the food
  3. She sings everyday
  4. She danced all the way
  5. The boy ran to school
  6. She is playing outside the house
  7. She is studying for the competition
  8. He drove to her house
  9. I am packing the office files
  10. I bought the oranges yesterday

IELTS| Verbs: How you can improve your vocabulary with the use of Verbs, Types of Verbs and Examples


Example of state of being of an a subject

  1. She is a girl
  2. Kate feels good today
  3. I am a woman
  4. He loves his wife
  5. The baby looks cute
  6. She is sad
  7. Your hair is beautiful
  8. Open the torn bag
  9. See the wretched man

A subject is a noun or pronoun and the doer of the verb in a sentence

There Are Two Parts of a Verb

  1. Main verb
  2. Auxiliary verb
  3. Linking verb

Main verb

Main verbs are words that show the action of the subject. They can stand on their own

Example

Read, play, eat, shines, run, walk

Examples of these in a sentence

  1. She reads everyday
  2. He plays football
  3. She eats a lot
  4. The sun shines
  5. He runs to school
  6. I walked to the office

Auxiliary/helping verbs

Auxiliary verbs give more meaning to the main verb and cannot stand alone. It is also said to help the main verb and shows when an action occurs or is required.

Example

May, can, shall, must, be, will, have

Let’s look at the examples in a sentence

  1. We shall see
  2. She must come
  3. You can go
  4. You may leave

Okay! Let’s identify some main verbs and helping verbs in a sentence

  1. She is studying for her exams
  2. I have to walk to the office
  3. The small girl was carrying a big bag
  4. I may come today
  5. I will bring the bag today
  6. She has bought a television
  7. We shall fight it all
  8. You can go there yourself
  9. I must carry the big chair
  10. You can shut the door

Note:

Helping verbs are not the main verbs

Action verbs are the main verbs


How to Identify a Verb

Now let me show you a trick on how to identify a verb

Every verb has three forms which are:

-The present tense

-The past tense

-The future tense

These tenses has to go well with the verb in the sentence, in a situation where it does not, then the chosen word is not a verb

Let’s look at some examples

  1. I dance well

Applying the tense rule: let’s look at the tenses of “dance” which is our chosen verb

Present tense     past tense      future tense

Dance                danced             will dance

From the present tense:- I dance well

From the past tense:- I danced well

From the future tense:- I will dance well

So when you look at the above tenses, you will see that all the tenses of dance fit well into the sentence. Which means dance is the correct verb in the sentence

Let’s look at more examples

  1. I like to pray

Now let’s take our verb to be pray and apply the rule of tense

From the present tense: I like to pray

From the past tense: I like to prayed

From the future tense: I like to will pray

You can see that the above tenses do not fit well into the sentence, so “pray” is not the correct verb

Now let’s choose “like” to be our verb

From the present tense: – I like to pray

From the past tense: – I liked to pray

From the future tense: – I will like to pray

Wow! It fits… right? So the correct verb is like

  1. She go driving round the street

Lets take our verb to be “driving”

From the present tense: – she is driving to church

From the past tense: -she is droving to church

From the future tense: – she is will drove to church

You can also see very well that none of these fits into the sentence. Which means driving is not the correct verb

Let’s choose “go” as our verb

From the present tense: – she goes driving round the street

From the past tense: – she went driving round the street

From the future tense: – she will go driving round the street

So the correct verb here is “go”

  1. I buy mango from the market

Let’s choose “buy” to be our verb

From the present tense: – I buy mango from the market

From the past tense: – I bought mango from the market

From the future tense: – I will buy mango from the market

So the correct verb is “buy”

Let’s take the final example

  1. I have to come to your house

Let’s choose our verb to be “come”

Applying the tense rule:

From the present tense: – I have to come to your house

From the past tense: – I have to came to your house

From the future tense: – I have to will come to your house

Very wrong right?… so “come” is not the correct verb

Let’s choose “have” to be our verb

From the present tense: – I have to come to your house

From the past tense: – I had to come to your house

From the future tense: – I will have to come to your house

That’s beautiful… it perfectly fit. So the correct verb in the sentence is “have”

  1. The sun shines

Let’s choose our verb to be “shines”

From the present tense: – the sun shines

From the past tense: – the sun shone

From the future tense: – the sun will shine

Beautiful… so shines is the correct verb in the sentence

  1. I have to walk to the office

Let’s choose our verb to be “walk’

From the present tense: – I have to walk to the office

From the past tense: – I have to walked to the office

From the future tense: – I have to will walk to the office

Very bad… right? So walk is not the correct verb

Let’s try ‘have’ as the verb

From the present tense: – I have to walk to the office

From the past tense: – I had to walk to the office

From the future tense: – I will have to walk to the office

You can try out more yourself


Linking verbs

These are verbs that do not express an action. However, they connect the subject of a verb in a sentence to additional information about that subject.

  1. John is a carpenter

The verb “Is” connects the subject “John” to something said about him, that he is a carpenter.

  1. The teacher slapped the student

The verb “slapped” connects the subject “teacher” to something said about him/her, that him/her slapped the student

  1. Terry always feel sleepy each time she studies at night

The verb “feel” connects the subject “Terry’ to something said about her, that she sleeps each time she studies at night

  1. She likes eating spoilt foods

The verb “likes” connects the subject ‘she’ to something said about her, that she likes eating spoilt foods

  1. Harry is an alcoholic

The verb “is” connects the subject “Harry” to something said about him, that he is an alcoholic

Some verbs are both linking and action verbs, depending on their use.

True linking verbs are: Is, are, being, was, been, has, might, seem, become. They are always linking verbs

There are also some verbs with split personalities: look, appear, smell, taste, turn, and feel. Sometimes they are linking verbs; sometimes they are action verbs

If you can substitute is, am, or are and the sentence stills sounds logical, then you have a linking verb

If after substituting, the sentence makes no sense, then you have an action verb   

Example

  1. The food tasted good

Now let’s substitute it to find out if it’s a linking or action verb

The food is good

Wow! It sounds logical. Therefore, it’s a linking verb in this sentence

  1. The heavy rain scattered everything outside

Now let’s substitute it to find out if it’s a linking or action verb

The heavy rain is everything outside

The heavy rain are everything outside

The heavy rain am everything outside

You can see that none of these fits into the sentence. Therefore we have an action verb

  1. The company funded my education

Now let’s substitute it to find out if it’s a linking or action verb

The company is my education

Funny enough, the company can’t be your education. Therefore we have an action verb

  1. The boy played well

Now let’s substitute it to find out if it’s a linking or action verb

The boy is well

Nice try! Right? So we have a linking verb

  1. Her husband saw a very good man

Now let’s substitute it to find out if it’s a linking or action verb

Her husband is a very good man

Beautiful… so we have a linking verb

There are other classifications of a verb.

CLASSIFICATIONS OF A VERB

A verb can either be classified as transitive or intransitive depending on whether it needs an object to make a complete meaning or not. These verbs are called transitive or intransitive verbs

Transitive Verbs

What Is A Transitive Verb?

Transitive verbs are verbs that express action and have an object to receive that action. They are verbs that accept one or more objects. They require a direct object which is a noun, pronoun or noun phrase that follows the verb and completes the meaning of the sentence by showing the person or thing receiving the action of the verb.

A transitive verb can also have an indirect object which is a noun, pronoun or noun phrase that comes before a direct object and shows the person or thing that receives the action done.

To understand this topic very well, you have to know what a subject and an object is. You can refer to my post here for that.

The indirect object is in italics in the examples below

Example

  1. My husband loves me

From the sentence, “me” is receiving the action (love) from my husband. Therefore loves is the transitive verb

  1. Peter broke the pot

From the sentence, “The pot” is receiving the action (broke) cursed by Peter. Therefore broke is the transitive verb

  1. Many children failed the exam

From the sentence, “exam” is receiving the action (failed) cursed by the children. Therefore failed is the transitive verb

  1. John ate the food in the kitchen

From the sentence, “the food” is receiving the action (ate) cursed by John. Therefore ate is the transitive verb

  1. She walked home yesterday

From the sentence, “home” is receiving the action (walked) cursed by She. Therefore walked is the transitive verb

  1. I put the meat in the fridge

From the sentence, “the meat” is receiving the action (put) cursed by I. therefore put is the transitive verb

  1. Jane gave her mother the bag in the room

From the sentence, “her mother” is receiving the action (gave) cursed by Jane. Therefore gave is the transitive verb

  1. The rat ate the food in the kitchen

From the sentence, “the food” is receiving the action (ate) cursed by the rat. Therefore ate is the transitive verb

  1. The lawyer brought my father’s will

From the sentence, “the lawyer” is receiving the action (brought) cursed by my father. Therefore brought is the transitive verb

  1. David gave her a cake

From the sentence, “her” is receiving the action (gave) cursed by the David. Therefore gave is the transitive verb

Intransitive verb

Intransitive verbs are verbs that do not take a direct object. This means that no word in the sentence tells what or who received the action of the verb. They are usually complete without a direct object. They answer questions of how?

Example

  1. Everybody passed
  2. She played outside in the field
  3. She cried bitterly
  4. Faith worked throughout the day
  5. The teacher talked all through the day

Note: some verbs can also be transitive and intransitive

Example

  1. She walks for miles (this is an intransitive verb as it has no direct object)

She walks the dog for miles (this is a transitive verb as it has a direct object)

  1. She played outside in the field (this is an intransitive verb as it has no direct object)

She played football outside in the field (this is a transitive verb as it has a direct object)

  1. The teacher talked all through the day (this is an intransitive verb as it has no direct object)

The teacher talked to her all through the day (this is a transitive verb as it has a direct object)

  1. She cried bitterly (this is an intransitive verb as it has no direct object)

She cried bitterly for the dog (this is a transitive verb as it has a direct object)

  1. Everybody passed (this is an intransitive verb as it has no direct object)

Everybody passed the exam (this is a transitive verb as it has a direct object)

Why Should I Bother About Transitive And Intransitive Verb?

Verbs are commonly used by native speakers of English either during learning or teaching.  They are very useful when discussing verbs, direct and indirect objects.

Here is a short video for additional learning

https://youtu.be/TtTT-Ygo7uY

Now let’s do some practice to revise all we’ve learnt

Identify the verbs in the sentences below

  1. I slapped the boy that stole my book
  2. She talks a lot in school
  3. Doris had to wear the dress
  4. Harry feels bad this morning
  5. She is a book worm

Answers

  1. I slapped the boy that stole my book
  2. She talks a lot in school
  3. Doris had to wear the dress
  4. Harry feels bad this morning
  5. She is a book worm

Identify the different ways verbs can occur

  1. I slapped the boy that stole my book
  2. She talks a lot in school
  3. Doris had to wear the dress
  4. Harry feels bad this morning
  5. She is a book worm

Answer

  1. I slapped the boy that stole my book

Action verb

  1. She talks a lot in school

       Action verb

  1. He wears his glasses every morning

Action verb

  1. Harry feels bad this morning

State of being

  1. She is a book worm

State of being

Identify the main verb and helping verb in the following sentence

  1. He is wearing his glasses this morning
  2. The sun shines everywhere
  3. I shall see you soon
  4. The principal must come to school today
  5. You can shut the door if you want
  6. Doris had to wear the dress
  7. She has to work this morning
  8. Jane will walk you out please
  9. We shall see tomorrow
  10. I must go to school today

Answer

 Ꝏ= helping verb

= main verb

This article can be very helpful to you in preparing for your ielts. You can visit online articles on ielts to get more knowledge. Thank you for reading!

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